Hard Drive Stats for Q1 2017

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2017 hard drive stats

In this update, we’ll review the Q1 2017 and lifetime hard drive failure rates for all our current drive models, and we’ll look at a relatively new class of drives for us – “enterprise”. We’ll share our observations and insights, and as always, you can download the hard drive statistics data we use to create these reports.

Our Hard Drive Data Set

Backblaze has now recorded and saved daily hard drive statistics from the drives in our data centers for over 4 years. This data includes the SMART attributes reported by each drive, along with related information such a the drive serial number and failure status. As of March 31, 2017 we had 84,469 operational hard drives. Of that there were 1,800 boot drives and 82,669 data drives. For our review, we remove drive models of which we have less than 45 drives, leaving us to analyze 82,516 hard drives for this report. There are currently 17 different hard drives models, ranging in size from 3 to 8 TB in size. All of these models are 3½” drives.

Hard Drive Reliability Statistics for Q1 2017

Since our last report in Q4 2016, we have added 10,577 additional hard drives to bring us to the 82,516 drives we’ll focus on. We’ll start by looking at the statistics for the period of January 1, 2017 through March 31, 2017 – Q1 2017. This is for the drives that were operational during that period, ranging in size from 3 to 8 TB as listed below.

hard drive failure rates by model

Observations and Notes on the Q1 Review

You’ll notice that some of the drive models have a failure rate of “0” (zero). Here a failure rate of zero means there were no drive failures for that model during Q1 2017. Later, we will cover how these same drive models faired over their lifetime. Why is the quarterly data important? We use it to look for anything unusual. For example, in Q1 the 4 TB Seagate drive model: ST4000DX000, has a high failure rate of 35.88%, while the lifetime annualized failure rate for this model is much lower, 7.50%. In this case, we only have a 170 drives of this particular drive model, so the failure rate is not statistically significant, but such information could be useful if we were using several thousand drives of this particular model.

There were a total 375 drive failures in Q1. A drive is considered failed if one or more of the following conditions are met:

  • The drive will not spin up or connect to the OS.
  • The drive will not sync, or stay synced, in a RAID Array (see note below).
  • The Smart Stats we use show values above our thresholds.
  • Note: Our stand-alone Storage Pods use RAID-6, our Backblaze Vaults use our own open-sourced implementation of Reed-Solomon erasure coding instead. Both techniques have a concept of a drive not syncing or staying synced with the other member drives in its group.

The annualized hard drive failure rate for Q1 in our current population of drives is 2.11%. That’s a bit higher than previous quarters, but might be a function of us adding 10,577 new drives to our count in Q1. We’ve found that there is a slightly higher rate of drive failures early on, before the drives “get comfortable” in their new surroundings. This is seen in the drive failure rate “bathtub curve” we covered in a previous post.

10,577 More Drives

The additional 10,577 drives are really a combination of 11,002 added drives, less 425 drives that were removed. The removed drives were in addition to the 375 drives marked as failed, as those were replaced 1 for 1. The 425 drives were primarily removed from service due to migrations to higher density drives.

The table below shows the breakdown of the drives added in Q1 2017 by drive size.

drive counts by size

Lifetime Hard Drive Failure Rates for Current Drives

The table below shows the failure rates for the hard drive models we had in service as of March 31, 2017. This is over the period beginning in April 2013 and ending March 31, 2017. If you are interested in the hard drive failure rates for all the hard drives we’ve used over the years, please refer to our 2016 hard drive review.

lifetime hard drive reliability rates

The annualized failure rate for the drive models listed above is 2.07%. This compares to 2.05% for the same collection of drive models as of the end of Q4 2016. The increase makes sense given the increase in Q1 2017 failure rate over previous quarters noted earlier. No new models were added during the current quarter and no old models exited the collection.

Backblaze is Using Enterprise Drives – Oh My!

Some of you may have noticed we now have a significant number of enterprise drives in our data center, namely 2,459 Seagate 8 TB drives, model: ST8000NM055. The HGST 8 TB drives were the first true enterprise drives we used as data drives in our data centers, but we only have 45 of them. So, why did we suddenly decide to purchase 2,400+ of the Seagate 8 TB enterprise drives? There was a very short period of time, as Seagate was introducing new and phasing out old drive models, that the cost per terabyte of the 8 TB enterprise drives fell within our budget. Previously we had purchased 60 of these drives to test in one Storage Pod and were satisfied they could work in our environment. When the opportunity arose to acquire the enterprise drives at a price we liked, we couldn’t resist.

Here’s a comparison of the 8 TB consumer drives versus the 8 TB enterprise drives to date:

enterprise vs. consumer hard drives

What have we learned so far…

  1. It is too early to compare failure rates – The oldest enterprise drives have only been in service for about 2 months, with most being placed into service just prior to the end of Q1. The Backblaze Vaults the enterprise drives reside in have yet to fill up with data. We’ll need at least 6 months before we could start comparing failure rates as the data is still too volatile. For example, if the current enterprise drives were to experience just 2 failures in Q2, their annualized failure rate would be about 0.57% lifetime.
  2. The enterprise drives load data faster – The Backblaze Vaults containing the enterprise drives, loaded data faster than the Backblaze Vaults containing consumer drives. The vaults with the enterprise drives loaded on average 140 TB per day, while the vaults with the consumer drives loaded on average 100 TB per day.
  3. The enterprise drives use more power – No surprise here as according to the Seagate specifications the enterprise drives use 9W average in idle and 10W average in operation. While the consumer drives use 7.2W average in idle and 9W average in operation. For a single drive this may seem insignificant, but when you put 60 drives in a 4U Storage Pod chassis and then 10 chassis in a rack, the difference adds up quickly.
  4. Enterprise drives have some nice features – The Seagate enterprise 8TB drives we used have PowerChoice™ technology that gives us the option to use less power. The data loading times noted above were recorded after we changed to a lower power mode. In short, the enterprise drive in a low power mode still stored 40% more data per day on average than the consumer drives.
  5. While it is great that the enterprise drives can load data faster, drive speed has never been a bottleneck in our system. A system that can load data faster will just “get in line” more often and fill up faster. There is always extra capacity when it comes to accepting data from customers.

    Wrapping Up

    We’ll continue to monitor the 8 TB enterprise drives and keep reporting our findings.

    If you’d like to hear more about our Hard Drive Stats, Backblaze will be presenting at the 33rd International Conference on Massive Storage Systems and Technology (MSST 2017) being held at Santa Clara University in Santa Clara California from May 15th – 19th. The conference will dedicate five days to computer-storage technology, including a day of tutorials, two days of invited papers, two days of peer-reviewed research papers, and a vendor exposition. Come join us.

    As a reminder, the hard drive data we use is available on our Hard Drive Test Data page. You can download and use this data for free for your own purpose, all we ask is three things 1) you cite Backblaze as the source if you use the data, 2) you accept that you are solely responsible for how you use the data, and 3) you do not sell this data to anyone, it is free.

    Good luck and let us know if you find anything interesting.

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Confessions Of A Digital Pack Rat: Almost Half A Petabyte And Still Growing

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Retired rack server

What do you do when you have almost half a petabyte (PB) of data? That’s the situation in which Michael Oskierko finds himself. He’s a self-proclaimed digital pack rat who’s amassed more than 390 terabytes (TB) total, and it’s continuing to grow.

Based in Texas, Michael Oskierko is a financial analyst by day. But he’s set up one of the biggest personal data warehouses we’ve seen. The Oskierko family has a huge collection of photos, videos, documents and more – much more than most of us. Heck, more data than many companies have.

How Did It Get Like This?

“There was a moment when we were pregnant with our second child,” Michael explained. “I guess it was a nesting instinct. I was looking at pictures of our first child and played them back on a 4K monitor. It was grainy and choppy.”

Disappointed with the quality of those early images, he vowed to store future memories in a pristine state. “I got a DSLR that took great pictures and saved everything in RAW format. That’s about 30 MB per image right there.”

Michael says he now has close to 1 million photos (from many different devices, not just the DSLR) and about 200,000 videos stored in their original formats. Michael says that video footage from his drone alone occupies about 300 GB.

The Oskierkos are also avid music listeners: iTunes counts 707 days’ worth of music in their library at present. Michael keeps Green Day’s entire library on heavy rotation, with a lot of other alternative rock a few clicks away. His wife’s musical tastes are quite broad, ranging from rap to gospel. They’re also avid audiobook listeners, and it all adds up: Dozens more TB of shared storage space dedicated to audio files.

What’s more, he’s kept very careful digital records of stuff that otherwise might have gotten tossed to the curbside years ago. “I have every single note, test, project, and assignment from 7th grade through graduate school scanned and archived,” he tells us. He’s even scanned his textbooks from high school and college!

“I started cutting these up and scanning the pages before the nifty ‘Scan to PDF’ was a real widespread option and duplexing scanners were expensive,” he said.

One of the biggest uses of space isn’t something that Michael needs constant access to, but he’s happy to have when the need arises. As a hobbyist programmer who works in multiple languages and on different platforms, Michael maintains a library of uncompressed disk images (ISOs) which he uses as needed.

When you have this much storage, it’s silly to get greedy with it. Michael operates his sprawling setup as a personal cloud for his family members, as well.

“I have a few hosted websites, and everyone in my family has a preconfigured FTP client to connect to my servers,” he said.

Bargain Hunting For Big Storage

How do you get 390 TB without spending a mint? Michael says it’s all about finding the right deals. The whole thing got started when a former boss asked if Michael would be interested in buying the assets of his shuttered computer repair business. Michael ended up with an inventory of parts which he’s successfully scavenged into the beginning of his 390 TB digital empire.

He’s augmented and improved that over time, evolving his digital library over six distinct storage systems that he’s used to maintaining all of his family’s personal data. He keeps an eye out wherever he can for good deals.

“There are a few IT support and service places I pass by on my daily commute to work,” he said. He stops in periodically to check if they’re blowing out inventory. Ebay and other online auction sites are great places for him to find deals.

“I just bought 100 1 TB drives from a guy on eBay for $4 each,” he said.

Miscellaneous parts

Michael has outgrown and retired a bunch of devices over the years as his storage empire has grown, but he keeps an orderly collection of parts and supplies for when he has to make some repairs.

How To Manage Large Directories: Keep It Simple

“I thoroughly enjoy data archiving and organizing,” Michael said. Perhaps a massive understatement. While he’s looked at Digital Asset Management (DAM) software and other tools to manage his ever-growing library, Michael prefers a more straightforward approach to figuring out what’s where. His focus is on a simplified directory structure.

“I would have to say I spend about 2 hours a week just going through files and sorting things out but it’s fun for me,” Michael said. “There are essentially five top-level directories.”

Documents, installs, disk images, music, and a general storage directory comprise the highest hierarchy. “I don’t put files in folders with other folders,” he explained. “The problem I run into is figuring out where to go for old archives that are spread across multiple machines.”

How To Back Up That Much Data

Even though he has a high-speed fiber optic connection to the Internet, Michael doesn’t want to use it all for backup. So much of his local backup and duplication is done using cloning and Windows’ built-in Xcopy tool, which he manages using home-grown batch files.

Michael also relies on Backblaze Personal Backup for mission-critical data on his family’s personal systems. “I recommend it to everyone I talk to,” he said.

In addition to loads of available local storage for backups, three of his Michael’s personal computers back up to Backblaze. He makes them accessible to family members who want the peace of mind of cloud-based backup. He’s also set up Backblaze for his father in law’s business and his mother’s personal computer.

“I let Backblaze do all the heavy lifting,” he said. “If you ever have a failure, Backblaze will have a copy we can restore.”

Thanks from all of us at Backblaze for spreading the love, Michael!

What’s Next?

The 390 TB is spread across six systems, which has led to some logistical difficulties for Michael, like remembering to power up the right one to get what he needs (he doesn’t typically run everything all the time to help conserve electricity).

Command Central

“Sometimes I have to sit there and think, ‘Where did I store my drone footage,’” Michael said.

To simplify things, Michael is trying to consolidate his setup. And to that end, he recently acquired a decommissioned Storage Pod from Backblaze. He said he plans to populate the 45-bay Pod with as large hard drives as he can afford, which will hopefully make it simpler, easier and more efficient to store all that data.

Well, as soon as he can find a great deal on 8 TB and 10 TB drives, anyway. Keep checking eBay, Michael, and stay in touch! We can’t wait to see what your Storage Pod will look like in action!

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Protecting Your Account

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Editor’s Note: This is a copy of an email sent to our customers on 4/28/17. The Backblaze login database has in no way been compromised. That said, we have seen a number of automated login attempts to our site and wanted to alert our users of the risk. See below for more info.
=====
Dear Customer –

Over the last 72 hours, our security team has noticed an increase in automated attempts to log into our users’ accounts using credentials stolen from other websites. To protect your account, we recommend that you:

Change your password
● Add Two-Factor Authentication for additional security

NOTE: The Backblaze login database has not been compromised – the credentials were stolen from other sources.

Regrettably, we live in an era where companies have been breached and their customers’ credentials have been leaked – Dropbox , Adobe , and LinkedIn are just a few, high profile examples. What happens in these attacks is that the attacker acquires “the Dropbox list” and simply tries those usernames and passwords on another site. If your credentials were leaked in one of those hacks and you used the same username/password combination to sign up for other services (such as ours), you are vulnerable.

While we have a number of methods in place to thwart nefarious attacks, there is a limit to what we can do to prevent someone from signing in to an account with a valid username and password. We are sending this message to you today because we know that some of our users credentials are in these stolen lists.

Changing your password now ensures you’re not using a password that was previously leaked. Adding Two-Factor Authentication provides an extra layer of security and protection if end up on one of these lists in the future.

Thank you,

Tim
Chief Cloud Officer
Backblaze

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Deleted or Changed A File You Need Back? Backblaze Can Help!

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How to Restore Lost Files

Sometimes we like to spotlight some of our most-used functionality. This particular feature of Backblaze’s Personal Backup can get you out of a bind: Suddenly find yourself looking for a missing file? Or have you opened a file only to find out that it’s changed?

Having a local backup can get you recover quickly. If you have a Time Machine backup for your Mac, Windows Backup for your PC, hard disk clone or another backup, now’s the time to put it into action. But what if that backup isn’t working or has gone missing?

How it came to this is much less important than how to get back what’s gone. Fortunately, Backblaze users have a secret weapon at their fingertips which can erase up to a month’s worth of mistakes! Backblaze helps you recover a file from a point before it was changed or deleted, going back 30 days. Here’s how.

To restore a deleted or changed file using Backblaze

  1. Sign in to your account on Backblaze.com.
  2. Click on My Account.
  3. Click on View/Restore Files under Overview.
  4. Scroll down the screen to view your current backup.
  5. At the top of your backup directory, specify the date range of the backup files. Leave the “from:” menu set to “Beginning of Time.” Set the “to:” menu to a date or time before the document was deleted or changed. If you’re not sure when the file was changed, go back to the earliest instance you can find.
  6. Once you’ve located the disk, file, or folder you’d like to restore, click the checkbox next to its name.
  7. Click the “Continue with Restore” button.

Enormous file and directory restores can take a while, especially if you have limited Internet bandwidth. If you have a very large file or directory to recover – 500 GB or more – you can use our Restore Return Refund program.

Restore Return Refund sends your backup on disk to make for an easy, straightforward restoration. Select the file or directories you want to restore. Then order them to be sent to you either on USB thumbdrive (for restores up to 128 GB) or USB hard disk drive (for restores up to 4 TB). We restore your files safely and securely from our data center onto that device, which FedEx delivers to your door. You can keep the drive if you wish, or return it to us within 30 days, and we’ll refund the price – $99 for the USB thumb drive, $189 for the 4 TB drive.

With Backblaze keeping track of your files, rest more comfortably knowing that you can undo mistakes and tragedies before they become full-blown crises.

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Steel To Tin: The First 10 Years of Backblaze

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Today Backblaze celebrates turning 10 years old. Tin is the traditional gift for a ten year wedding anniversary: a sign of strength and flexibility. Getting to this point took not only the steel to make the servers, but tin as well.

How things have changed:

2007 2017
Team Five Founders in a Palo Alto apartment 55 employees around the country
Storage Hard drives strung together 60-drive, tool-less Storage Pods
Drives 1 TB drives 8 TB and 10 TB dries
Redundancy RAID redundancy 20-Storage Pod Vault redundancy
Storage 45 TB of total stored customer data 300,000+ TB
Customers A few friends as customers Hundreds of thousands across 125 countries
Files Saved 1 customer’s data restored (mine) 20 billion+ files restored
Business Lines Consumer Backup Consumer Backup, Business Backup, and Cloud Storage
Financials $0 revenue Millions in revenue and profitable
Mission Make storing data astonishingly easy and low-cost Make storing data astonishingly easy and low-cost

From Our Humble Beginnings In 2007:

To Over 300 Petabytes in 2017:

Someone recently asked me, “Does Backblaze look now the way you imagined it would ten years ago?” The honest answer? I had never imagined what it would like in ten years; when trying to figure out how to even get to market, that timespan wasn’t even on my radar. When we were filming our first video, we were more concerned with finding our first customer than planning our first birthday.

Now, not only has it been a decade, but we’re signing 5-year data center contracts and talking about what the company will look like in ten years and beyond. We often say that we hope this will be the last job for our employees.

Thinking back, a few things I learned:

  • Staying in business is as much about commitment as cash.
  • The existential risks are hard to predict.
  • The hardest times are rarely due to tech or business; they’re personal.
  • The accepted wisdom is often wrong.
  • Less money often leads to better solutions.
  • Culture affects everything.

I’ll expand on all of these in future posts. Over the next few months, I’ll be more active in bringing back our entrepreneurship series of blog posts. Don’t worry, our Hard Drive Stats and all the other stuff aren’t going anywhere!

But today is about the community that makes Backblaze what it is: None of it would have been possible without all of the people who built Backblaze as their own company every day, our friends and boosters, partners, and (of course) our incredible customers. While I did not, and likely could not, imagine a decade ago where Backblaze would be today, I’m thrilled at where we have arrived. Thank you.

And tomorrow, onto the next decade.

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Backblaze B2 Drops Download Price By 60%

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B2 Costs 60% Less

We are thrilled to announce that, effective immediately, we are reducing the price of Backblaze B2 Cloud Storage downloads from $0.05 to $0.02 per GB. What’s more, the first gigabyte of data downloaded each day is still free.

Backblaze has always aimed to make storing data astonishingly easy and affordable. This price reduction applies immediately to all existing and new customers, and there are no tiers or minimums required to get this pricing. It’s automatic, and it starts today.

Why Does This Matter?

It makes cloud storage useful for more people.

B2 is already known for being reliable, easy-to-use, and affordable – our storage pricing is ¼ that of S3. This allows you to save more thorough backups, keep longer archives, store large data sets needed for machine learning and much more. Reducing the price of downloading data lowers the total cost of using cloud storage. This makes cloud storage a viable solution for organizations where it previously didn’t make financial sense.

For example, Vintage Aerial has over 50 years’ worth of aerial photography of rural America. It’s an American treasure. They scanned and digitized the photos and needed a place to cost effectively store the hi-res image files they would send to their customers. Before B2, the other cloud storage options were simply too expensive, leaving Vintage Aerial in the unenviable position of trying to figure out which of their assets they could offer for sale online. But, as Vintage Aerial CEO Fritz Byers says, “because of B2’s pricing, reliability, and service levels, Vintage Aerial is now able to offer and monetize our complete catalog of over 20 million pictures to anyone that’s interested.”

Today’s reduction in download pricing opens another opportunity for Vintage Aerial – downloading high-res photos as previews to its customers. Customers will soon be able to see in detail what they’re getting and zoom in to request specific parts of photos. B2 is empowering Vintage Aerial to provide new functionality that dramatically improves the customer experience and expands the company’s market.

It gives you access to your data when you need it.

Backblaze B2 removes the need to choose between cost and access when it comes to storing your data in the cloud. When you store data in the cloud, you expect to be able to retrieve it at some point. Some services make it expensive to restore data or place time lag impediments to data access to reduce their cost. That reduces the usefulness of your data. If you need to recover all your data quickly from an archive or backup or want to make your data available in real-time, you don’t want to wait, and you don’t want to be shocked at the price tag.

It ensures that your data is yours.

When it’s expensive to get data out, you feel like your cloud storage provider is holding your files hostage. You can’t switch providers or move data back on-site. Part of Backblaze B2 being easy is ensuring that you can do what you want, when you want, with your information. Reducing the price of downloads ensures you can feel comfortable knowing your data is yours.

It’s another reason for third party applications to integrate with B2.

Many organizations already manage their data backups, archives, and workflows using third party applications that have integrated with B2 Cloud Storage. Applications like CloudBerry, Synology CloudSync, Retrospect, Cantemo, axle Video, CatDV and many others have added B2 support in their products; over the next few months, Transmit and QNAP will release their integrations as well.

For applications that have integrated with B2, users not only get the lowest cost storage but the lowest cost download bandwidth as well. For application providers, integrating B2 offers a differentiated service for their users. If you use an application that doesn’t use B2 Cloud Storage, ask the application provider to add B2 and mention the application in the comments below.

It reduces your bill.

Regardless of how you use B2, the download price reduction matters because it lowers your bill. And a lower bill means you can lower your cost and increase your margins, or lower your prices – each of which makes business better.

How does this compare?

Not only is Backblaze B2 storage 1/4th the price of Amazon S3, Google Cloud, or Azure, but our download pricing is now as little as 1/4th their price as well.

Pricing Tier Backblaze B2 Amazon S3 Microsoft Azure Google Cloud
First 1 TB $0.02 $0.09 $0.09 $0.12
Next 9 TB $0.02 $0.09 $0.09 $0.11
Next 40 TB $0.02 $0.085 $0.09 $0.08
Next 100 TB $0.02 $0.07 $0.07 $0.08
Next 350 TB+ $0.02 $0.05 $0.05 $0.08

Using the chart above, let’s compute a few examples of download costs…

Data Backblaze B2 Amazon S3 Microsoft Azure Google Cloud
1 terabyte $20 $90 $90 $120
10 terabytes $200 $900 $900 $1,200
50 terabytes $1,000 $4,300 $4,500 $4,310
500 terabytes $10,000 $28,800 $29,000 $40,310
Not only is Backblaze B2 pricing dramatically lower cost, it’s also simple. One price for any amount of data downloaded to anywhere. In comparison, to compute the cost of downloading 500 TB of data with S3 you start with the following formula: (($0.09 * 10) + ($0.085 * 40) + ($0.07 * 100) + ($0.05 * 350)) * 1,000. Want to see this comparison for the amount of data you manage? Use our cloud storage calculator.

How did we do this?

Easy, we just lowered the price.

We’ve been reducing the cost of cloud storage for a decade, building and open-sourcing our Storage Pods, developing our Vaults, and more. As a result, we know a fair bit about storing data cost efficiently.

When we announced B2 Cloud Storage, we weren’t totally sure how individuals and companies would use bandwidth, and so we priced it competitively within the market. With a year and a half of B2 usage (and a decade of related experience storing customer data), we’ve determined the patterns are sufficiently stable that we can sustainably reduce our pricing.

To sum up our pricing, downloading data costs $0.02/GB, with the first gigabyte downloaded each day being free. Storage costs are $0.005/GB per month with the first 10 gigabytes being free. We have just one pricing tier so you get the best price we can offer from the start.

Our aim has always been to provide a great service at a fair price. While we’re certainly proud to be the low-cost leader in the space, we’re much happier that we can help customers to be more effective in their businesses.

Enjoy the service, and I’d love to hear in the comments what this price reduction means for you.

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A History of Removable Computer Storage

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A History of Removable Storage

Almost from the start we’ve had a problem with computers: They create and consume more data than we can economically store. Hundreds of companies have been created around the need for more computer storage. These days if we need space we can turn to cloud services like our own B2 Cloud Storage, but it hasn’t always been that way. The history of removable computer storage is like the history of hard drives: A fascinating look into the ever-evolving technology of data storage.

The Birth of Removable Storage

Punch Cards

punch card

Before electronic computers existed, there were electrical, mechanical computing devices. Herman Hollerith, a U.S. census worker interested in simplifying the laborious process of tabulating census data, made a device that read information from rectangular cards with holes punched in particular locations to indicate information like marital status and age.

Hollerith’s cards long outlasted him and his machine. With the advent of electronic computers in the 1950s, punch cards became the de facto method of data input. The conventions introduced with punch cards, such as an 80 column width, affected everything from the way we’d make computer monitors to the format of text files for decades.

Open-Reel Tapes and Magnetic Cartridges

IBM 100 tape drive

Magnetic tape drives were standard issue for the mainframes and minicomputers used by businesses and other organizations from the advent of the computer industry in the 1950s up until the 1980s.

Tape drives started out on 10 1/2-inch reels. A thin metal strip recorded data magnetically. Watch any television program of this era and the scene with a computer will show you a device like this. The nine-track tapes developed by IBM for its computers could store up to 175 MB per tape. At the time, that was a tremendous amount of data, suitable for archiving days or weeks’ worth of data. These days 175 MBs might be enough to store a few dozen photos from your smartphone. Times have changed!

Eventually the big reel to reel systems would be replaced with much more portable, easier-to-use, and higher density magnetic tape cartridges. Mag tapes for data backup found their way into PCs in the 80s and 90s, though they, too, would be replaced by other removable media systems like CD-R burners.

Linear Tape-Open (LTO) made its debut in the late 1990s. These digital tape cartridges could store 100 GB each, making them ideal for backing up servers and archiving big projects. Since then capacity has improved to 6.0 TB per tape. There’s still a demand for LTO data archival systems today. However, tape drives are nearing their end of usefulness as better cloud options takeover the backup and archival markets. Our own B2 Cloud Storage is rapidly making LTO a thing of the past.

Burning LTO

Winchester Drives

IBM 3340 Winchester drive

Spinning hard disk drives started out as huge refrigerator-sized boxes attached to mainframe computers. As more businesses found uses for computers, the need for storage increased, but allowable floor space did not. IBM’s solution for this problem came in the early 1970s: the IBM 3340, popular known as a Winchester.

The 3340 sported removable data modules that contained hard drive platters which could store up to 70 MB. Instead of having to buy a whole new cabinet, companies leasing equipment from IBM could buy additional data modules to increase their storage capabilities.

From the start, the 3340 was a smashing success (okay, maybe smashing isn’t the best adjective to use when describing a hard drive, but you get the point). You could find these and their descendants connected to mainframes and minicomputers in corporate data centers throughout the 1970s and into the 1980s.

The Birth of the PC Brings New Storage Solutions

Cassette Recorder

TRS-80 w cassette drive

The 1970s saw another massive evolution of computers with the introduction of first generation personal computers. The first PCs lacked any built-in permanent storage. Hard disk drives were still very expensive. Even floppy disk drives were rare at the time. When you turned the computer off, you’d lose your data, unless you had something to store it on.

The solution that the first PC makers came up was to use a cassette recorder. Microcassettes exploded in the consumer electronic market as a convenient and inexpensive way for people to record and listen to music and use for voice dictation. At a time that long-distance phone calls were an expensive luxury, it was the original FaceTime for some of us, too: I remember as a preschooler, recording and playing cassettes to stay in touch with my grandparents on the other side of the country.

So using a cassette recorder to store computer data made sense. The devices were already commonplace and relatively inexpensive. Type in a save command, and the computer played tones through a cable connected to the tape drive to differentiate binary 0s and 1s. Type in a load command, and you could play back the tape to read the program into memory. It was very slow. But it was better than nothing.

Floppy Disk

Commodore 1541

The 1970s saw the rise of the floppy disk, the portable storage format that ultimately reigned supreme for decades. The earliest models of floppy disks were eight inches in diameter and could hold about 80 KB. Eight-inch drives were more common in corporate computing, but when floppies came to personal computers, the smaller 5 1/4-inch design caught on like wildfire.

Floppy disks became commonplace alongside the Apples and Commodores of the day. You could squeeze about 120 KB onto one of those puppies. Doesn’t sound like a lot, but it was plenty of space for Apple DOS and Lode Runner.

Apple popularized the 3 1/2-inch size when it introduced the Macintosh in 1984. By the late 1980s the smaller floppy disk size – which would ultimately store 1.44 MB per disk – was the dominant removable storage medium of the day. And so it would remain for decades.

The Bernoulli Box

Bernoulli Box

In the early 1980s, a new product called the Bernoulli Box would offer the convenience of removable cartridges like Winchester drives but in a much smaller, more portable format. It was called the Bernoulli Box. The Bernoulli box was an important removable storage device for businesses who had transitioned from expensive mainframes and minicomputers to desktops.

Bernoulli cartridges worked on the same principle as floppies but were larger and in a much more shielded enclosure. The cartridges sported larger capacities than floppy disks, too. You could store 10 MB or 20 MB instead of the 1.44 MB limit on a floppy disk. Capacities would increase over time to 230 MB. Bernoulli Boxes and the cartridges were expensive, which kept them in the realm of business storage. Iomega, the Bernoulli Box’s creator, turned its attention to an enormously popular removable storage system you’ll read about later: the Zip drive.

SyQuest Disks

SyQuest drive

In the 1990s another removable storage device made its mark in the computer industry. SyQuest developed a removable storage system that used 44 MB (and later 88 MB) hard disk platters. SyQuest drives were mainstays of creative digital markets – I saw them on almost any I could find a Mac doing graphic design work, desktop publishing, music, or video work.

SyQuest would be a footnote by the late 90s as Zip disks, recordable CDs and other storage media overtook them. Speaking of Zip disks…

The Click of Death

Zip Drive

The 1990s were a transitionary period for personal computing (well, when isn’t it, really). Information density was increasing rapidly. We were still years away from USB thumb drives and ubiquitous high-speed Wi-Fi, so “sneakernet” – physically transporting information from one computer to another – was still the preferred way to get big projects back and forth. Floppy drives were too small, hard disks weren’t portable, and rewritable CDs were expensive.

Iomega came along with the Zip Drive, a removable storage system that used disks shaped like heavier-duty floppies, each capable of storing up to 100 MB on them. A high-density floppy could store 1.4 MB or so, so it was orders of magnitude more of portable storage. Zip Disks quickly became popular, but Iomega eventually redesigned them to lower the cost of manufacturing. The redesign came with a price: The drives failed more frequently and could damage the disk in the process.

The phenomenon became known as the Click of Death: The sound the actuator (the part with the read/write head) would make as it reset after hitting a damaged sector on the disk. Iomega would eventually settle a class-action lawsuit over the issue, but consumers were already moving away from the format.

Iomega developed a successor to the Zip drive: The Jaz drive. When it first came out, it could store 1 GB on a removable cartridge. Inside the cartridge was a spinning hard disk mechanism; it wasn’t unlike the SyQuest drives that had been popular a few years before, but in a smaller size you could easily fit into a jacket pocket. Unfortunately, the Jaz drive developed reliability problems of its own – disks would get jammed in the drives, drives overheated, and some had vibration problems.

Recordable CDs and DVDs

Apple SuperDrive

As a storage medium, Compact Discs had been around since the 1980s, mainly popular as a music listening format. CD burners connected to computers from the beginning, but they were ridiculously huge and expensive: The size of a washing machine and tens of thousands of dollars. By the late 1990s technology improved, prices lowered and recordable CD burners – CD-Rs – became commonplace.

With our ever-increasing need for more storage, we moved on to DVD-R and DVD-RW systems within a few years, upping the total you could store per disc to 4.3 GB (eventually up to 8 GB per disc once dual-layer media and burners were introduced).

Blu-Ray Disc offers even greater storage capacity and is popular for its use in the home entertainment market, so some PCs have added recordable Blu-Ray drives. Blu-ray sports capacities from 25 to 128 GB per disc depending on format. Increasingly, even optical drives have become optional accessories as we’ve slimmed down our laptop computers to improve portability.

Magneto-Optical

Magneto-optical disk

Another optical format, Magneto-Optical (MO), was used on some computer systems in the 80s and 90s. It would also find its way into consumer products. The cartridges could store 650 MB. Initial systems were only able to write once to a disc, but later ones were rewriteable.

NeXT, the other computer maker founded by Steve Jobs besides Apple, was the earliest desktop system to feature a MO drive as standard issue. Magneto-optical drives were available in 5 1/4-inch and 3-inch physical sizes with capacities up to 9 GB per disc. The most popular consumer incarnation of magneto-optical is Sony’s MiniDisc.

Removeable Storage Moves Beyond Computers

SD Cards

SD Cards

The most recent removable media format to see widespread adoption on personal computers is the Secure Digital (SD) Card. SD cards have become the industry standard most popular with many smartphones, still cameras, and video cameras. They can serve up data securely thanks to password protection, smartSD protocol and Near Field Communication (NFC) support available in some variations.

With no moving parts and non-volatile flash memory inside, SD cards are reliable, quiet and relatively fast methods of transporting and archiving data. What’s more, they come in different physical sizes to suit different device applications – everything from postage stamp-sized cards found in digital cameras to fingernail-sized micro cards found in phones.

Even compared to 5 1/4-inch media like Blu-ray Discs, SD card capacities are remarkable. 128 GB and 256 GB cards are commonplace now. What’s more, the SDXC spec maxes out at 2 TB, with support for 8K video transfer speeds possible. So there’s some headroom both for performance and capacity.

The More Things Change

As computer hardware continues to improve and as we continue to demand higher performance and greater portability and convenience, portable media will change. But as we’ve found ourselves with ubiquitous, high-speed Internet connectivity, the very need for removable local storage has diminished. Now instead of archiving data on an external cartridge, disc or card, we can just upload it to the cloud and access it anywhere.

That doesn’t obviate the need for a good backup strategy, of course. It’s vital to keep your important files safe with a local archive or backup. For that, removable media like SD cards and rewritable DVDs and even external hard drives can continue to fill an important role. Remember to store your info offsite too, preferably with a continuous, secure and reliable backup method like Backblaze Cloud Backup: Unlimited, unthrottled and easy to use.

The post A History of Removable Computer Storage appeared first on Backblaze Blog | Cloud Storage & Cloud Backup.

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How Backblaze Got Started: The Problem, The Solution, and the Stuff In-Between

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data center setup

Backblaze will be celebrating its ten year anniversary this month. As I was reflecting on our path to get here, I thought some of the issues we encountered along the way are universal to most startups. With that in mind, I’ll write a series of blog posts focused on the entrepreneurial journey. This post is the first and focuses on the birth of Backblaze. I hope you stick around and enjoy the Backblaze story along the way.

What’s Your Problem?

The entrepreneur builds things to solve problems – your own or someone else’s. That problem may be a lack of something that you wish existed or something broken you want to fix. Here’s the problem that kicked off Backblaze and how it got noticed:

Brian Wilson, now co-founder and CTO of Backblaze, had been doing tech support for friends and family, as many of us did. One day he got a panicked call from one of those friends, Lise.

Lise: “You’ve got to help me! My computer crashed!”
Brian: “No problem – we’ll get you a new laptop; where’s your backup?”
Lise: “Look, what I don’t need now is a lecture! What I need is for you to get my data back!”

Brian was religious about backing up data and had been for years. He burned his data onto a CD and a DVD, diversifying the media types he used. During the process, Brian periodically read some files from each of the discs to test his backups. Finally, Brian put one disc in his closet and mailed another to his brother in New Mexico to have it offsite. Brian did this every week!

Brian was obviously a lot more obsessive than most of us.

Lise, however, had the opposite problem. She had no backup. And she wasn’t alone.

Whose Problem Is It?

A serious pain-point for one person may turn out to be a serious pain-point for millions.

At this point, it would have been easy just to say, “Well that sucks” or blame Lise. “User error” and “they just don’t get it” are common refrains in tech. But blaming the user doesn’t solve the problem.

Brian started talking to people and asking, “Who doesn’t back up?” He also talked with me and some of the others that are now Backblaze co-founders, and we asked the same question to others.

It turned out that most people didn’t back up their computers. Lise wasn’t the anomaly; Brian was. And that was a problem.

Over the previous decade, everything had gone digital. Photos, movies, financials, taxes, everything. A single crashed hard drive could cause you to lose everything. And drives would indeed crash. Over time everything would be digital, and society as a whole would permanently lose vast amounts of information. Big problem.

Surveying the Landscape

There’s a well-known adage that “Having no competition may mean you have no market.” The corollary I’d add is that “Having competition doesn’t mean the market is full.”

Weren’t There Backup Solutions?

Yes. Plenty. In fact, we joked that we were thirty years too late to the problem.

“Solutions Exist” does not mean “Problem Solved.” Even though many backup solutions were available, most people did not back up their data.

What Were the Current Solutions?

At first glance, it seems clear we’d be competing with other backup services. But when I asked people “How do you back up your data today?”, here were the answers I heard most frequently:

  • Copy ‘My Documents’ directory to an external drive before going on vacation
  • Copy files to a USB key
  • Send important files to Gmail
  • Pray
  • And “Do I need to back up?” (I’ll talk about this one in another post.)

Sometimes people would mention a particular backup app or service, but this was rare.

What Was Wrong With the Current Solutions?

Existing backup systems had various issues. They would not back up all of the users’ data, for example. They would only back up periodically and thus didn’t have current data. Most solutions were not off-site, so fire, theft or another catastrophe could still wipe out data. Some weren’t automatic, which left more room for neglect and user error.

“Solutions Exist” does not mean “Problem Solved.”

In fairness, some backup products and services had already solved some of these issues. But few people used those products. I talked with a lot of people and asked, “Why don’t you use some backup software/service?”

The most common answer was, “I tried it…and it was too hard and too expensive.” We’d learn a lot more about what “hard” and “expensive” meant along the way.

Finding and Testing Solutions

Focus is critical for execution, but when brainstorming solutions, go broad.

We considered a variety of approaches to help people back up their files.

Peer-to-Peer Backup: This was the original idea. Two people would install our backup software which would send each person’s data to the other’s computer. This idea had a lot going for it: The data would be off-site; It would work with existing hardware; It was mildly viral.

Local Drive Backup: The backup software would send data to a USB hard drive. Manually copying files to an external drive was most people’s idea of backing up. However, no good software existed at the time to make this easy. (Time Machine for the Mac hadn’t launched yet.)

Backup To Online Services: Weirder and more unique, this idea stemmed from noticing that online services provided free storage: Flickr for photos; Google Docs for documents and spreadsheets; YouTube for movies; and so on. We considered writing software that would back up each file type to the service that supported it and back up the rest to Gmail.

Backup To Our Online Storage: We’d create a service that backed up data to the cloud. It may seem obvious now, but backing up to the cloud was just one of a variety of possibilities at the time. Also, initially, we didn’t mean ‘our’ storage. We assumed we would use S3 or some other storage provider.

The goal was to come up with a solution that was easy.

We put each solution we came up with through its paces. The goal was to come up with a solution that was easy: Easy for people to use. Easy to understand.

Peer-to-peer backup? First, we’d have to explain what it is (no small task) and then get buy-in from the user to host a backup on their machine. That meant having enough space on each computer, and both needed to be online at the same time. After our initial excitement with the idea, we came to the conclusion that there were too many opportunities for things to go wrong. Verdict: Not easy.

Backup software? Not off-site, and required the purchase of a hard drive. If the drive broke or wasn’t connected, no backup occurred. A useful solution but again, too many opportunities for things to go wrong. Verdict: Not easy.

Back up to online services? Users needed accounts at each, and none of the services supported all file types, so your data ended up scattered all over the place. Verdict: Not easy.

Back up to our online storage? The backup would be current, kept off-site, and updated automatically. It was easy to for people to use, and easy to understand. Verdict: Easy!

Getting To the Solution

Don’t brainstorm forever. Problems don’t get solved on ideas alone.

We decided to back up to our online storage! It met many of the key goals. We started building.

Attempt #1

We built a backup software installer, a way to pick files and folders to back up, and the underlying engine that copies the files to remote storage. We tried to make it comfortable by minimizing clicks and questions.

Fail #1

This approach seemed easy enough to use, at least for us, but it turned out not to be for our target users.

We thought about the original answer we heard: “I tried it…and it was too hard and too expensive.”

“Too hard” is not enough information. What was too hard before? Were the icons too small? The text too long? A critical feature missing? Were there too many features to wade through? Or something else altogether?

Dig deeper into users’ actual needs

We reached out to a lot of friends, family, and co-workers and held some low-key pizza and beer focus groups. Those folks walked us through their backup experience. While there were a lot of difficult areas, the most complicated part was setting up what would be backed up.

“I had to get all the files and folders on my computer organized; then I could set up the backup.”

That’s like cleaning the garage. Sounds like a good idea, but life conspires to get in the way, and it doesn’t happen.

We had to solve that or users would never think of our service as ‘easy.’

Takeaway: Dig deeper into users’ actual needs.

Attempt #2

Trying to remove the need to “clean the garage,” we asked folks what they wanted to be backed up. They told us they wanted their photos, movies, music, documents, and everything important.

We listened and tried making it easier. We focused our second attempt at a backup solution by pre-selecting everything ‘important.’ We selected the documents folder and then went one step further by finding all the photo, movies, music, and other common file types on the computer. Now users didn’t have to select files and folders – we would do it for them!

Fail #2

More pizza and beer user testing had people ask, “But how do I know that my photos are being backed up?”

We told them, “we’re searching your whole computer for photos.”

“But my photos are in this weird format: .jpg, are those included? .gif? .psd?”

We learned that the backup process felt nebulous to users since they wouldn’t know what exactly would be selected. Users would always feel uncomfortable – and uncomfortable isn’t ‘easy.’

Takeaway: No, really, keep digging deeper into users’ actual needs. Identify their real problem, not the solution they propose.

Attempt #3

We took a step back and asked, “What do we know?”

We want all of our “important” files backed up, but it can be hard for us to identify what files those are. Having us guess makes us uncomfortable. So, forget the tech. What experience would be the right one?

Our answer was that the computer would just magically be backed up to the cloud.

Then one of our co-founders Tim wondered, “what if we didn’t ask any questions and just backed up everything?”

At first, we all looked at him askew. Backup everything? That was a lot of data. How would that be possible? But we came back to, “Is this the right answer? Yes. So let’s see if we can make it work.”

So we flipped the entire backup approach on its head.

We didn’t ask users, “What do you want to have backed up.” We asked, “What do you NOT want to be backed up?” If you didn’t know, we’d back up all your data. It took away the scary “pick your files” question and made people comfortable that all their necessary data was being backed up.

We ran that experience by users, and their surprised response was, “Really, that’s it?” Hallelujah.

Success.

Takeaway: Keep digging deeper. Don’t let the tech get in the way of understanding the real problem.

Pricing

Pricing isn’t a side-note – it’s part of the product. Understand how customers will perceive your pricing.

We had developed a solution that was easy to use and easy to understand. But could we make it easy to afford? How much do we charge?

We would be storing a lot of data for each customer. The more data they needed to store, the more it would cost us. We planned to put the data on S3, which charged $0.15/GB/month. So it would seem logical to follow that same pricing model.

People thought of the value of the service rather than an amount of storage.

People had no idea how much data they had on their hard drive and certainly not how much of it needed to be backed up. Worse, they could be off by 1000x if they weren’t sure about the difference between megabytes and gigabytes, as some were.

We had to solve that too, or users would never think of our service as ‘easy.’

I asked everyone I could find: “If we were to provide you a service that automatically would backup all of the data on your computer over the internet, what would that be worth to you?”

What I heard back was a bell-curve:

  • A small number of people said, “$0. It should be free. Everything on the net is free!”
  • A small number of people said, “$50 – $100/month. That’s incredibly valuable!”
  • But by far the majority said, “Hmm. If it were $5/month, that’d be a no-brainer.”

A few interesting takeaways:

  • Everyone assumed it would be a monthly charge even though I didn’t ask, “What would you pay per month.”
  • No one said, “I’d pay $x/GB/month,” so people thought of the value of the service rather than an amount of storage.
  • There may have been opportunities to offer a free service and attempt to monetize it in other ways or to charge $50 – $100/month/user, but these were the small markets.
  • At $5/month, there was a significant slice of the population that was excited to use it.

Conclusion On the Solution

Over and over again we heard, “I tried backing up, but it was too hard and too expensive.”

After really understanding what was complicated, we finally got our real solution: An unlimited online backup service that would back up all your data automatically and charge just $5/month.

Easy to use, easy to understand, and easy to afford. Easy in the ways that mattered to the people using the service.

Often looking backward things seem obvious. But we learned a lot along the way:

  • Having competition doesn’t mean the market is full. Just because solutions exist doesn’t mean the problem is solved.
  • Don’t brainstorm forever. Problems don’t get solved on ideas alone. Brainstorm options, but don’t get stuck in the brainstorming phase.
  • Dig deeper into users’ actual needs. Then keep digging. Don’t let your knowledge of tech get in the way of your understanding the user. And be willing to shift course as your learn more.
  • Pricing isn’t a side-note. It’s part of the product. Understand how customers will perceive your pricing.

Just because we knew the right solution didn’t mean that it was possible. I’ll talk about that, along with how to launch, getting early traction, and more in future posts. What other questions do you have? Leave them in the comments.

The post How Backblaze Got Started: The Problem, The Solution, and the Stuff In-Between appeared first on Backblaze Blog | Cloud Storage & Cloud Backup.

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Wanted: Sr. System Administrator

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Are you a Linux SysAdmin who is looking for a challenging and fast-paced working environment? Want to a join our dynamic team and help Backblaze grow to new heights? Our Operations team is a distributed and collaborative group of individual contributors. We work closely together to build and maintain our home grown cloud storage farm, carefully controlling costs by utilizing open source and various brands of technology, as well as designing our own cloud storage servers. Members of Operations participate in the prioritization and decision making process, and make a difference everyday. The environment is challenging, but we balance the challenges with rewards, and we are looking for clever and innovative people to join us.

Responsibilities:

  • Lead projects across a range of IT disciplines
  • Understand environment thoroughly enough to administer/debug any system
  • ollaborate on automated provisioning & updating of systems with Ansible and other tools
  • Collaborate on strategic planning (optimize performance, reduce cost, increase efficiency, mitigate risk)
  • Collaborate on network security
  • Collaborate on network administration
  • Participate in the 24×7 on-call rotation and respond to alerts as needed

Requirements:

  • Expert knowledge of Linux administration (Debian preferred)
  • Scripting skills
  • Experience in automation/configuration management (Ansible preferred)
  • Position based in the San Mateo Corporate Office in California

Technology @ Backblaze:
Backblaze is one of the largest cloud storage providers around. That means our ecosystem creates interesting challenges (and the occasional problem) at a very large scale. As of this listing we have well over 75,000 hard drives holding over 300 Petabytes of data.

Core technologies we use:

  • Debian Linux
  • Java/Tomcat
  • Ansible
  • Cassandra
  • MySQL
  • Supermicro

Required for all Backblaze Employees

  • Good attitude and willingness to do whatever it takes to get the job done.
  • Desire to learn and adapt to rapidly changing technologies and work environment.
  • Relentless attention to detail.
  • Excellent communication and problem solving skills.
  • Backblaze is an Equal Opportunity Employer and we offer competitive salary and benefits, including our no policy vacation policy.

Company Description:
Founded in 2007, Backblaze started with a mission to make backup software elegant and provide complete peace of mind. Over the course of almost a decade, we have become a pioneer in robust, scalable low cost cloud backup. Recently, we launched B2 – robust and reliable object storage at just $0.005/gb/mo. Part of our differentiation is being able to offer the lowest price of any of the big players while still being profitable.

We’ve managed to nurture a team oriented culture with amazingly low turnover. We value our people and their families. Don’t forget to check out our “About Us” page to learn more about the people and some of our perks.

We have built a profitable, high growth business. While we love our investors, we have maintained control over the business. That means our corporate goals are simple – grow sustainably and profitably.

Some Backblaze Perks:

  • Competitive healthcare plans
  • Competitive compensation and 401k
  • All employees receive Option grants
  • Unlimited vacation days
  • Strong coffee
  • Fully stocked Micro kitchen
  • Catered breakfast and lunches
  • Awesome people who work on awesome projects
  • Childcare bonus
  • Normal work hours
  • Get to bring your pets into the office
  • San Mateo Office – located near Caltrain and Highways 101 & 280.

If this sounds like you — follow these steps:

  1. Send an email to jobscontact@backblaze.com with the position in the subject line.
  2. Include your resume.
  3. Tell us a bit about your experience and why you’re excited to work with Backblaze.

The post Wanted: Sr. System Administrator appeared first on Backblaze Blog | Cloud Storage & Cloud Backup.

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What’s New With B2 Cloud Storage

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What's New With B2

Backblaze B2 continues to grow in popularity as developers, IT personnel and more realize the benefits of affordable cloud storage. Our B2 engineering team continues to add features and capabilities to B2 that our users identify as being helpful in getting their job done. Here’s a collection of recent updates to B2 you may find useful.

5 MB Large File part size – When working with large files, the minimum file part size can now be set as low as 5 MB versus the previous low setting of 100 MB. The range of a file part when working with large files can be from 5 MB to 5GB. We recommend using the default of 100 MB, but in cases where RAM is limited a smaller size can be useful.

SHA-1 at the end – This feature allows you to compute the SHA-1 checksum and append it to the end of the request body versus doing the computation before sending the file. This is especially useful for those applications which stream data to B2.

Cache-Control – When data is downloaded from B2 into a browser, the length of time the file remains in the browser cache can be set using the following syntax:

{“cache-control” : “max-age-NNN”}
where NNN is the number of seconds to cache the file.

Cache-Control policies are set at the bucket level using the b2_create_bucket and b2_update_bucket API calls. Setting this policy is optional.

Life Cycle Rules – Create rules that allow you to manage the length of time deleted files will remain in your B2 bucket before deletion. A great option for managing the cleanup of outdated file versions to save on storage costs.

Time Machine backup – You may know that you can use your Synology NAS as the destination for your Time Machine backup. With B2 you can also sync your Synology NAS to B2 for a true 3-2-1 backup solution.

B2 user Groups – Backblaze B2 users can now use Backblaze B2 along with the new Backblaze Groups Management functionality. Group Management allows administrators to pay for their team’s B2 usage and Managed Groups even allow administrators to share access to B2-enabled Backblaze accounts.

B2 Integrations

Here are a couple of recently completed B2 integrations:

Retrospect – A proven backup and archive service for servers, virtual machines and more. Now you can choose Backblaze B2 as a cloud storage destination.

Cantemo – A media asset management system that allows you to create sophisticated rules to automatically route, archive and restore an asset or collection to and from B2 Cloud Storage.

Odds-and-Ends

If you’re new to B2, check out our recent B2 Demo webinar (registration required). The demo will introduce you to B2 and show you how you can use B2 to backup, archive, and sync your data to the B2 cloud.

If you have suggestion for a B2 feature or enhancement, let us know by contacting Backblaze B2 support. Thanks.

The post What’s New With B2 Cloud Storage appeared first on Backblaze Blog | Cloud Storage & Cloud Backup.

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